History

Kaharoa School was first opened in 1907. Until then the first school was Oturoa on Oturoa Road and all Kaharoa children had to travel there for formal schooling. In February 1907 six local families with 20 children total, petitioned for the establishment of a school at Kaharoa. The school duly opened in May of 1907 with six pupils, who had to be housed in a 16’ x 12’ building loaned free of charge by a Mr. Hedges.

A tender to build the permanent classroom was signed in October of 1908, for a sum of two hundred and twenty eight pounds and ten shillings. It included the school building, shelter shed, toilets, 20 chain of fencing and school gates. The building was opened on 1 March 1909. The school closed in March 1949 when the roll collapsed and did not re-open until 1953 and only then when the locals realised the building was in danger of being removed. The roll slowly grew and in March 1965 a new classroom and administration block was commissioned, as well as a new swimming pool. On Christmas day 1972 the original school building was burned down. Not only was the building lost but also many valuable historic documents, records, and school library books perished. A relocatable building was placed on site making two permanent classrooms and teachers. In March 2007 the school celebrated its Centenary. A new swimming pool complex and astroturf tennis courts were officially opened at the end of 2007 and 2009 saw the opening of our Kokako Centre a multi purpose building.

Today Kaharoa School enjoys modern and up to date facilities, this includes a 25 metre solar heated pool, Kokako Centre (that is used for a diverse range of activities including art displays, guitar tuition, choir, drama and assemblies), community kitchen, camping facilities with changing rooms and showers, multipurpose all weather floodlit astroturf courts and expansive grounds. The school has 8 well resourced classrooms equipped with electronic whiteboards and other information and communication technology, a modern administration block and library.

School Crest And Motto
The school crest shows a native Kokako sitting on a branch inside a circle which represents unity. The Kokako is representative of a group which still exist in the local native bush and reminds us of the depth of history which is an important part of our school’s past.
The motto “Taa Maatou Pai Ake” or “Our Best Always.

last edited: Fri, July 01, 2016